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20121201
20121231
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Book TV 11
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CSPAN2 11
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 12:00am EST
their historical significance and view the landscape today. from washington's crossing of the delaware to the battle of her clan. it's about an hour, 15. [applause] >> the subtitle of this book is an old irishman not being funny, so it's a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known two geniuses in my life. one is dead and the other robert sullivan is alive although that robert sullivan is not the robert sullivan who is with us this evening. not exactly, but more about that in a moment. first this robert sullivan is the author of seven extraordinary books, meadowlands, the whale hunt, how do not to get rich, rats, cross-country, the thoreau you don't know and the one that brings us here to delancey st., "my american revolution." in my humble opinion each of these books is in its way a masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive, e. tizon investigation of the american mindscape and sulzgeber related with the american landscape. each confronts the obvious, where there are garbage drunk -- garbage dump or a family road trip or a transcend
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:30am EST
. from washington's crossing of the dollar to the battle of brooklyn, it is about an hour and 15. [applause] >> this subtitle of this book is old irishman. it is a great honor to introduce the author and my friend, robert sullivan. i have known to geniuses in my life. one is dead, and the other, robert sullivan, is alive. although that reversal in is not the robber solomon he was receiving. not exactly, but more but then the moment. first, brazil and is the author of seven extra hour bucks. meadowlands, will hunt, how not to get rich, rats, cross-country , the throw you don't know, and the one that brings us here, my american revolution. in mine and humble opinion each of these books is its own line and masterpiece. wonderfully idiosyncratic, uniquely incisive. each is an investigation of the american my state and song skate into relative with the american landscape. fleet contends the obvious, whether a garbage dump comes or the species despise rodents or family richard or a transcendental and back and allows us to see what we didn't and will we couldn't will we didn't want to,
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 6:00pm EST
washington to proclaim the protesters vandals. this about 50 # -- 50 # minutes. >> there is nothing so easy but to persuade people they are badly governed. those words were spoken by the brilliant 18th century massachusetts governor thomas hutchenson, and i'll tell you more about him later. let me tell you what else he said because the words hold true today as much as they did then in 1774. governor hutchenson said you can take the happiest and most comfortable people and use malicious, rhetorical skills to arouse popular discontent with their government, with their rulers, with everything around them, even themselves. this is one of the weaknesses, he said, these are his words "one of the weaknesses of human nature of which ambitious politicians make you to serve their purposes." i year before he uttered those words, a group of boston rebel rowsers convinced americans they were miserable, and to quote hitchenson again, "those who think they are misrabble are so despite real evidence to the contrary." now, i doubt if there's a single one of today's tea party patriots who knew what the origi
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:15pm EST
washington or paul revere. now, the process for putting this book together was quite a journey for me. i started out as an easiest, then became a collector and then became an educator to her website called raglan in.com and ultimately through this book. the story how i first discovered historic newspapers have been about five years ago. at least when i took her first family vacation to illinois, a cozy mississippi river town, were on the main strip every discovered they were bookshop and in that rare book shop i found this nondescript container full of old newspapers, picked one up and started reading it and it april 21st 1865 near times. i was reading abraham lincoln assess the nation every word for the capture of his conspirators. that moment triggered in me an intense passion and enthusiasm for history that i previously had never had. so for the next five years, it became this journey of meticulous collecting a newspapers because i'm tucked away in the midwest. i don't have convenient access to a lot of the wonderful archives on the east coast. i don't have access to a lot of the orig
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 7:00pm EST
't an impersonator, it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i and his two dogs have lunch together on monday since the dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session and they could of rome and play. was a weird sight, believe me. we were brought into the tiny little conference room, the two dogs, the senator and me with a card table in the middle, and the senator who was always on a diet. he would feel better the center he was head the biggest sand which i'd ever seen like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was and on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of bread and potato chips and we talked for three or four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i am a historian, and i went find stuff, and whenever i find i'm going to put in the book and who knows, by the time this book comes out there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's naim what the joseph p. ken
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 11:00am EST
to say because i am from washington and because it is halloween and because i have three children, all of them love to trick or treat our will report that the most popular costume that has come up lately is binders full of women. what this halloween costume looks like is you put your arms in the binder, it is not a jack in the box but jacqueline in the box and jacqueline pops out of a folder in the halloween costume. who said we were dull in washington? we are very creative. i am going to tell the story that inspired me to write my book. this began in 2009. the book is based on an atlantic story that came out in 2010 and basically i had been vacationing in a town for a long time which was a prosperous working-class town and one year i went there a bit seemed there are not many men are round. i was seeing him in church or the fair grounds or driving down the street ritter trucks doing construction. this was the height of the housing collapse that anita hill talked-about. men were finding a hard time. we talked about the man session and loss of manufacturing jobs and i became curious abo
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 11:00pm EST
it is not an impersonator. it was the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington and the senator and i had his two dogs had lunch together. on monday his stocks came to the senate because the senate wasn't in session and they could roam and play in the senate. that's a weird site, believe me. we were brought into a tiny little conference room for two dogs, senator and me with the card table and the senator, who was always on the target. they believed he would feel better the center he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was end on a piece of bread. i had two pieces of red in potato chips. we talked for three, four hours. but i remember saying over and over again is you don't want me to write this book because i'm an historian and i'm going to find stuff. whatever i find, i'm going to put the book. and who knows, but by the time this book comes out, there might be a kennedy running for office. little did i know that that kennedy's name would be joseph p. kennedy to th
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 8:30am EST
it was not an impersonator, it was the senate asking me to come -- the senator asking me to come to washington to talk to him about doing a biography of his father. i went to washington, and the senator and i and his two dogs had lunch together. on mondays his dogs came to the senate with him because the senate wasn't in session, and they could roam, yeah, play in the senate. it was a weird sight, believe me. [laughter] we were brought into a tiny little conference room. the two dog, the senator and me with a card table in the middle. and the senator, who was always on a diet, they believed that his back, he would feel better the thinner he was, had the most bedraggled sandwich i've ever seen, you know, like a sliver of tuna fish that looked as old as he was. and on a piece of bread. i add two pieces -- i had two pieces of bread and potato chips. [laughter] and we talked for three, four hours. and what i remember saying over and over and over again is you don't want me to write this book. because i'm a historian, and i'm going to find stuff. and whatever i find, i'm going put in the book. and who knows, but
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 6:00pm EST
was african-american as well. i found belle's birth certificate, actually, in washington. she was born in washington, and it tells her birth date and lists 'c' for colored. and the family lived in washington for some years. greener was dean at the howard university law school. he was a very distinguished lawyer and scholar, an active republican. the republicans rewarded him for his service, recruiting blacks for the party, by making him the secretary of the grant monument in new--ulysses s. grant monument in new york, and he was appointed us consul in vladivostok by mckinley and roosevelt. but at some point, around that time, in the late 1890s, the family split up and they were--he was the darkest. the mother was very light-skinned and the children were very light-skinned. so they dropped the r off the end of their name and the mother said her name was genevieve i. greene, widow, although mr. greener was very much alive. and they brought--invented the name da costa, i think, to explain their exotic looks. and belle passed as white for the rest of her life, as far as i know. i don't thi
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 11:00pm EST
. kennedy, then bradley and his wife called tony. brad day, washington and your chief brought his reporter who later became an jim cannon who served president ford. they decided to make a tape not his decision but the kind of person that he is. we will talk about it after you listen. >> when was the moment you were absolutely ? >> to get the support it is just long long long. why? >> host: one thing that has been said about president kennedy he could be dispassionately analytical to talk about himself. right as a presidential campaign is beginning like he is the third party. >> what struck me about the dinner party conversation was how much he enjoyed politics. his passion. this is true with the tapes of the oval office. the delight of political life comes through very powerful and his conception was absolutely right. of the 19th century presidents did not do much with the tariff, slavery issue, but by the time of the presidency it was seen as a vaster institution of political life. >> host: feel free. >> i love said dinner party tape it was just given to the library five years ago. we're
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 3:00pm EST
that production version. when i began editing the world at "the washington post" in the '90s, american publishers were producing 50,000 books per year. ten years later, i'm still seeing the same position, and then they were producing 30,000 books annually. we were getting 100, 150 books a day, 40,000 books a year, only 1600 would be reviewed. in 2007, that number climbed to 415,000 books a year, published by american publishers. in 2009, a mere two years later, 1,100,000 books were published according to welcker. two thirds of number seven hundred 25,000 self published. you see that the whole idea of self-publishing, the social media that is what they reported. i suspect that only a portion of those would be published by university presses. it means less and less of a market for each title. the average book in america, believe it or not, sells 250 copies per year. when you average the millions that stephen king myself, and the one that unites elle of your life if you were to be self published. the american association of publishers concluded that actually this is the interesting part for me. over
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11